What are we really like?

Do we really have to make New Year’s Resolutions?

Studies have shown that people understand their health risks but do not necessarily change their lifestyle. Then why make resolutions and then suffer from sense of guilt?

Surveys have shown that 57 per cent of people are not motivated to stay healthy. Thirty four per cent of people have no time and 30 per cent have financial barriers to pursue a healthy life style.

What I really like to do today is to share with you an interesting column I read recently.

“What are we really like” is the title of a column written by Murray Campbell in a recent issue of The Globe and Mail. By looking at surveys done by different Canadian pollsters, he came up with one hundred items that reflect “what the nation’s prevailing neuroses are in a given year”.

From his list I have picked few health related items. See which item applies to you and whether you need to do something about it in 2003.

-8 per cent of Canadians report at least one major episode of depression in the past year

-15 per cent of Canadian men and 20 per cent of women say they have been under so much stress that they contemplated suicide

-20 per cent of children live up to Canada’s Food Guide and consume at least five portions of fruit and vegetables daily

-25 per cent of Manitobans smoke, the highest rate of tobacco use in Canada. Just 17 per cent of B.C. residents smoke.

-27 per cent of Canadians say they shun prescription and non-prescription drugs

-28 per cent of smokers say there should be a law preventing parents from lighting up at home if children are present

-34 per cent of Canadians take work home with them

-40 per cent of Canadian Forces members consider themselves fat

-48 per cent of children seven to 12 years old eat junk food for an afternoon snack

-50 per cent of Canadians are overweight or obese and 70 per cent of them are satisfied with their weight

-52 per cent of Canadians take vitamin supplements regularly but only 17 per cent say they eat the recommended daily servings from Canadian Food Guide

-59 per cent of adults say that gardening is their prime leisure activity.

-66 per cent believe family is more important than work

-71 per cent of British Columbians have signed an organ donation consent form, compared with 48 per cent in Manitoba and Saskatchewan

-73 per cent of Canadians are satisfied with their household income and 82 per cent are happy with their job

-75 per cent of Canadians work more than 40 hours a week with one in four clocking 50 hours

-83 per cent of drivers make sure their passengers are wearing their seat belts

-86 per cent of parents, guardians and other caregivers say they are overwhelmed by the amount of information on children’s health that is available; 46 per cent find the information is inconsistent, conflicting or out of date

-88 per cent of Canadians say there is no need to raise taxes to improve the medical-care system

-91 per cent of Canadians over the age of 40 say they are sexually satisfied, but only 73 per cent reported having sex in the past 12 months

-93 per cent of Canadians know that car exhaust affects air quality, but only two per cent are prepared to use their own vehicle less

-96 per cent of parents think their children are happy and well balanced

-97 per cent Canadians say they suffer from intestinal gas and about 15 per cent say they have cancelled a date or a meeting because of it

What puzzles me is why 91 per cent of Canadians over the age of 40 say they are sexually satisfied, but only 73 per cent reported having sex in the past 12 months – what about the rest of them? Do they suffer from intestinal gas? Or are they more interested in gardening?

Have a happy healthy new year – who cares whether it is with or without intestinal gas – Eddie Murphy never worried about it in The Nutty Professor!

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