What have we learned about COVID-19?

Red Rock Coulee in Alberta, Canada. (Dr. Noorali Bharwani)
Red Rock Coulee in Alberta, Canada. (Dr. Noorali Bharwani)

Here is the good news. The spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada is slowing down. But the bad news is, health officials warned it could come back with a vengeance this fall if contact tracing and testing aren’t stepped up.

What we are trying to do is to contain the virus because there is no vaccine or medications to kill the virus. Once the lockdown is lifted, it will leave many people vulnerable to infection as they begin to venture out again.

Unless there is a miracle, SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine will take time to be ready to be used.

The COVID-19 pandemic is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic.

Alberta has the third-most number of cases of COVID-19 in Canada. By June 3, there were 7,076 confirmed cases and 145 deaths. The majority of cases have been in the Calgary zone, which has 4,909 cases.

What do we know about coronaviruses?

Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that can cause illnesses such as the common cold, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). In 2019, a new coronavirus was identified as the cause of a disease outbreak that originated in China.

There are people who are infected but have no symptoms. Others have mild to moderate to severe symptoms.

Classical COVID-19 symptoms may appear two to 14 days after exposure to the virus. That is the incubation period. The common presentation is fever, cough, and tiredness.

Other symptoms can include: shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, muscle aches, chills, sore throat, loss of taste or smell, headache, and chest pain.

Other less common symptoms have been reported, such as rash, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

People who are older or who have existing chronic medical conditions, such as heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, severe obesity, chronic kidney or liver disease, or have compromised immune systems may be at higher risk of serious illness.

It is important you contact your health care provider if you have any of these symptoms. You should call 911 if you have trouble breathing, persistent chest pain or pressure, inability to stay awake, new confusion, blue lips or face.

The virus appears to spread easily among people. Data has shown that it spreads from person to person among those in close contact (within about six feet, or two meters). The virus spreads by respiratory droplets released when someone with the virus coughs, sneezes or talks. These droplets can be inhaled or land in the mouth or nose of a person nearby.

It can also spread if a person touches a surface with the virus on it and then touches his or her mouth, nose or eyes.

Prevention is better than cure. Since there is no vaccine to prevent COVID-19 the next best thing is to reduce your risk of infection by doing the following:

  1. Avoid large gatherings
  2. Avoid close contact
  3. Stay home as much as possible
  4. Wash hands often
  5. Wear a mask in public places
  6. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.

Yes, face masks combined with other preventive measures, such as frequent hand-washing and social distancing, help slow the spread of the disease.

If you have COVID-19 related symptoms you are legally required to isolate yourself.

If you have symptoms, take the online assessment to arrange testing.

Take care. Stay healthy.

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