Wasting Money on Fish Oil and Vitamin Supplements

Gaudi's depiction of breasts. (Dr. Noorali Bharwani)
Gaudi's depiction of breasts. (Dr. Noorali Bharwani)

Omega-3 supplements (fish oil supplements) are popular. The global market of these pills is valued at three billion dollars. More billions are spent by consumers on other supplements like vitamins and minerals. Experts say this kind of money can be used for better health by doing what is proven to be good for your heart, brain and rest of the body.

Smart way to meet your omega-3 needs is to eat healthy. There is no need to spend money on the pills.

Omega-3s are a family of essential fatty acids that play important roles in our body and may provide a number of health benefits. It is important to know, omega-3s are not produced in our body. We must get them from our diet because they are essential for our good health.

The three most important types of omega-3 are ALA (alpha-linolenic acid), DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid). ALA is mainly found in plants, while DHA and EPA occur mostly in animal foods and algae.

Common foods that are high in omega-3 fatty acids include fatty fish, fish oils, flax seeds, chia seeds, flaxseed oil, and walnuts.

People take fish oil to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes, to treat high triglycerides and high blood pressure, and to improve symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

What is the evidence?

There are about 3,000 scientific clinical trial reports on the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids. When teams of researchers scrutinized the most reliable of these studies, they concluded that the treatment potential of these supplements is minimal to nil. In a few cases, inconclusive.

Health Canada recommends you eat at least five ounces (150 grams) of cooked fish every week. You can also get EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids from eggs, fish oil supplements and EPA and DHA-enriched foods.

Evidence in the population generally does not support a beneficial role for omega−3 fatty acid pills in preventing cardiovascular disease (including myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death) or stroke. If you’re healthy and at low or average risk for heart disease, chances are you don’t need an omega-3 supplement (in the form of pills), provided you eat fish often.

Is it healthy to take vitamins and minerals on a regular basis?

Six years ago (December 17, 2013) an editorial in the Annals of Internal Medicine titled, “Enough Is Enough: Stop Wasting Money on Vitamin and Mineral Supplements” said despite sobering evidence of no benefit or possible harm, use of multivitamin supplements has increased among U.S. adults.

Three articles in this issue of the Annals address the role of vitamin and mineral supplements for preventing the occurrence or progression of chronic diseases.

The article concluded, β-carotene, vitamin E, and possibly high doses of vitamin A supplements are harmful.

Other pills like folic acid and B vitamins, and multivitamin and mineral supplements are ineffective for preventing death or sickness due to major chronic diseases.

The Annals editorial says although available evidence does not rule out small benefits or harms or large benefits or harms in a small subgroup of the population, they believe the case is closed – supplementing the diet of well-nourished adults with (most) mineral or vitamin supplements has no clear benefit and might even be harmful. These vitamins should not be used for chronic disease prevention. The editorial says, “Enough is enough.”

If you are a well-nourished healthy adult then you should not waste your money on vitamins and mineral pills.

According to Health Canada, more than half of Canadians use supplements vitamins, natural remedies and homeopathic methods. In Canada, The Natural Health Products Directorate was created in 1997 to regulate the industry. Millions of Canadians are spending millions of dollars on these supplements. Has this made Canadians healthy?

Here is a good example of immense wastage of tax dollars. A study published in the medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine (July 15, 2019) says, “Almost two-thirds of Ontario seniors who received vitamin B12 shots had no evidence of a B12 deficiency.” This needlessly cost the province’s health-care system $45.6 million annually.

Readers are cautioned not to stop using any pills without consulting their physician. If you are regularly taking omega-3 fatty acid pills, vitamin and mineral pills or injection then consult with your doctor to review your meds.

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